What Trust is Best?

(This article was originally published in the Wakefield Daily Item)

By PATRICK G. CURLEY, ESQ.

Q .  I signed a Trust but I’m not sure if it is Revocable or Irrevocable.  Does it matter?      

A.  Yes, there is an enormous difference.  Both can accomplish excellent goals so let me spell out the key differences.   

If you establish a revocable trust, it means that you can change it by revoking or amending it during your lifetime. Revocable trusts are most commonly known for helping avoid Probate upon death.  In addition, the revocable trust offers the grantor (the person establishing the trust) 100% control during their lifetime.  Since you are in full control, the revocable trust cannot offer any asset protection.

On the other hand, if your trust is irrevocable, you may not amend or revoke it and you give up a significant degree of control.  Because of this loss of control, irrevocable trusts are less common than revocable trusts and often misunderstood. Irrevocable trusts can offer protection that revocable trusts cannot. For many families the benefits outweigh the loss of some control.

By way of example, we often prepare irrevocable trusts for seniors because their desire to protect their home against nursing home costs and Medicaid far outweighs the loss of control imposed by the trust.  This is especially true after we show clients that we can customize the irrevocable trust to ensure that the client can continue to live in their home, that the trustee can sell the home if downsizing is desired, and the client can change the trustee to make sure the trust is well managed.

Because of the control limitations of an irrevocable trust, we do not advise that people put all their assets in an irrevocable trust.  In fact, we often recommend a mix of both an irrevocable trust and a revocable trust.

Both irrevocable and revocable trusts can be drafted to include a number of other beneficial provisions.

If you sell your home, you owe capital gains taxes on the gain in value, which is loosely defined as the difference between what you paid for your home and the sale price.  The government grants a tremendous tax benefit to homeowners under which unmarried individuals can exclude $250,000 in capital gains on the sale of their primary residence, and married folks can exclude $500,000.  Irrevocable and revocable trusts, if drafted correctly, can preserve this capital gains tax exclusion. Other types of planning, such as life estate deeds or transferring a home to a child, can reduce or eliminate the tax benefit.

Both revocable and irrevocable trusts can be drafted to include estate tax planning benefits for married couples, which can effectively double the amount of money they can pass tax free to their beneficiaries.  Instead of paying more than you need to the government in taxes you can preserve your savings for your family.

Another feature that attracts a lot of interest from clients is the ability to protect their family’s inheritances under the trust.  Upon the elder’s death, rather than the inheritance passing directly to the beneficiary, the inheritance stays in trust for the benefit of the beneficiary.  The funds can be used for the beneficiary’s health, education, maintenance and support.  But the funds are protected against a number of risks including lawsuits against a beneficiary, claims by a beneficiary’s creditors, and demands by a beneficiary’s spouse in a divorce settlement.

If a trust beneficiary is a minor or has special needs, we can ensure that their share can be protected too. Without this planning, an 18 year old beneficiary would receive his full inheritance — and potentially blow it on expenses you would not approve (flashy car, gambling, vacations, etc.).  Likewise, without this planning, an inheritance can cause a special needs beneficiary to lose eligibility for public benefits programs they may be receiving now or need in the future.  With careful planning, the inheritance can be used for the benefit of minors or special needs beneficiaries without jeopardizing benefits eligibility or being subject to wasteful spending.

Because of the range of design options, it is vital that you consult a Qualified Elder Law Attorney to discuss how these trusts can benefit you.

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Contact Us!

Do you have an Elder Law or Estate Planning question? E-mail questions to Info@CurleyLawFirm.com or call 781.245.2222 x10 to be considered for future columns).

About Curley Law Firm LLP

Serving clients throughout Massachusetts, Curley Law Firm LLP draws upon more than four decades of combined Estate Planning and Elder Law experience to ensure that you can achieve your planning goals.

Attorneys Patrick Curley and Lucy Budman are two of fewer than two dozen Certified Elder Law Attorneys (CELA) in Massachusetts. Attorney Mark Curley has practiced in the areas of Estate Planning and Elder Law for over three decades.

The value of working with a firm with CELAs on the team is the peace of mind you receive - knowing that you will get the very best advice available to protect yourself, your family and your assets. A CELA is a recognized expert in legal matters dealing with Estate Planning and Elder Law including Trusts, Wills, Asset Protection against Medicaid and nursing home costs, Medicaid (MassHealth) benefits planning and applications, Probate and Trust administration, Guardianship and Conservatorship, and VA benefits planning.

At a time when many lawyers claim to practice "elder law", having a CELA-led team working on your planning means having one of the very few experts in the Commonwealth on YOUR team.

For experienced representation and quality service from attorneys who will help you achieve your planning goals, please schedule a confidential Initial Consultation by calling us at (866) 406-8582 or visit our website at www.CurleyLawfirm.com

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